Shrub Wishlist

Friday, February 17, 2012

It's supposed to be at least 60 degrees today on February 17. It has me thinking spring, which isn't hard considering we had an almost nonexistent winter. I must not be alone because my local garden center is having a sale on trees and shrubs. That has me making a list of what I need for our yard revamp, and boy do we need a revamp.

My wishlist:

Winter Flame Dogwood (Cornus sanguinea)
It's important to think about how your garden looks throughout the year, and the Winter Flame Dogwood won't disappoint in the colder months. This is a showstopper in the winter when many of your shrubs are brown and leafless. The red and orange stems are dramatic, especially when set against snow or evergreens for us warm-winter folks. Plus they are great in flower arrangements. It needs full to part sun and is fairly drought resistant once it has established. The new growth has the most intense color so it should be pruned hard every year. It will grow 4-5 feet after it has been pruned hard.




Double Knockout Rose
This is a valentines gift to me. I sent my husband an email that read "I would like a double knockout rose bush for Valentines day." I'm so subtle. These roses are tough as nails. They are drought tolerant, pest resistant, and self cleaning. They are also prolific bloomers, producing blooms from spring through the fall. I plan to put mine behind the mailbox. They are also good for containers. They like full sun and grow to be 3-4 feet high and wide.


Endless Summer Hydrangea
We might be the only home in the south without a hydrangea bush. I plan to remedy that this year. Hydrangeas are a favorite of mine. They are gorgeous in the yard, beautiful in flower arrangements, and you can make them change colors. They like sun, but not too much, and they like moist soil, but not too much. It's a balancing act, but definitely manageable.


Steeds Upright Holly
Probably the least exciting of my selection, but a much needed plant to help improve the look of our foundation. A Steeds Upright Holly is something of a workhorse. It's easy to grow, has a moderate growth rate, and takes on a pleasing columnar shape topping out at 6-8 feet tall and 5-6 feet wide. Perfect for screens or foundations.

Also on the docket in the coming weeks: put up a new fence, build my raised beds and plot my garden!

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